Category Archives: Wood

Best Wood for Raised Garden Beds

Angelim Pedra Raised Garden Beds

The best wood for raised garden beds should last a long time without the need for chemical treatment.

Many homeowners looking to build raised garden beds want to grow fresh high quality vegetables they know are free from pesticides and chemicals.

In order to grow your vegetables without chemicals many experts recommend using natural materials that can not leach potentially harmful chemicals into your soil that then end up in your vegetables.

As a results most organic gardeners do not recommend the use of pressure treated wood.

Pressure treated wood is treated with chemicals to prevent the wood from rotting.

Older pressure treated wood contained CCA (chromated copper arsenate).

The EPA banned CCA in 2003 due to arsenic leaching from the pressure-treated wood and into the soil which can contaminate plants and people.

While the new pressure treated wood uses safer synthetic materials. The USDA Organic guidelines still doesn’t recommend them for organic growing:

A number of synthetic materials are now commonly used in place of CCA. These include alkaline copper quaternary, copper azole, and micronized copper azole. These materials are not currently allowed in organic production, as they are not included on the National List.” – USDA Organic Guidelines

Many of our customers come to us looking for a durable natural wood for raised garden beds. They have concerns about growing their food in a complete natural environment without the use of chemicals, pesticides, insecticides and fungicides.

Pressure treated wood typically contains some sort of fungicides and insecticides to protect the wood.

Here’s a write up from the USDA Forest Products Laboratory describing the two common pressure treated woods on the market:

Alkaline Copper Quat (ACQ)

The fungicides and insecticides in ACQ are expressed as copper oxide (67%) and a quaternary ammonium compound (quat, 33%). Multiple variations of ACQ have been standardized or are in the process of standardization. There are three types of ACQ: ACQ-B, ACQ-D, and ACQ-C. ACQ-B is an ammoniacal copper quat formulation; ACQ-D is an amine copper quat formulation; and ACQ-C is formulated with either ammonia or amine and a slightly different quat compound. Minimum retentions of 0.25 lb/ft3 or 0.4 lb/ft3 are specified for wood used above ground or in ground contact, respectively. A retention of 0.6 lb/ft3 is specified for critical structural members in ground contact.

Copper Azole (CBA-A and CA-B)

The first copper azole formulation developed was type A (CBA-A), which contains 49% copper, 49% boric acid, and 2% tebuconazole. Type B (CA-B) was more recently standardized. CA-B does not contain boric acid and contains 96% copper and 4% tebuconazole. Minimum retentions of CBA-A are 0.20 lb/ft3 and 0.41 lb/ft3 for wood used above ground or in ground contact, respectively. A retention of 9.8 kg/m3 (0.61 lb/ft3) is specified for critical structural members placed in ground contact. Minimum retentions of CA-B are 0.10 lb/ft3 or 0.21 lb/ft3 for wood used above ground or in ground contact, respectively. A retention of 0.31 lb/ft3 is specified for critical structural members placed in ground contact.

While most of the pressure treated wood manufacturers state they are safe for building raised garden beds, we get many customers that still would rather not use them.

Additionally most of the manufacturers care instructions state that you need to apply water repellant periodically to protect against moisture damage.

This would be difficult with damp or wet soil sitting against the inside of the boards constantly which will ultimately lead to fast rot and decay of the wood.

What about other softwoods such as Redwood or Cedar?

While Cedar and Redwood both have some natural rot resistance they are both softwoods that also require water repellant sealers to prevent water from penetrating the grain and rotting the wood.

Best Wood for Raised Vegetable Garden Beds

Our number one recommendation for raised vegetable garden beds is our Angelim Pedra Trailer Decking.

Angelim Pedra Raised Vegetable Garden Beds

This product is commonly used for large flat bed semi-trailers that haul huge excavators and bulldozers which can weigh upwards of 90,000 pounds.

Angelim Pedra is an all natural hardwood from South America that is readily available and responsibly harvested.

This natural hardwood has a janka hardness of 3,160. The janka hardness rating is simply an industry rating of various wood species hardness.

Western Red Cedar only has a Janka hardness of 350 and Redwood has a Janka hardness of 450. That makes Angelim Pedra almost 10 times harder than Western Red Cedar.

Our Angelim Pedra wood is exceptionally resistant to rot, decay and wood boring insects naturally without any chemical treatment applied to the wood.

There is no need to worry about applying water sealers to Angelim Pedra since it is naturally very rot resistant. You can put the soil right up against the wood and water your plants daily without concern.

The Angelim Pedra trailer decking comes in a shiplap profile so the boards overlap forming a nice tight seal.

Angelim Pedra is exceptionally beautiful once a simple UV oil finish is applied to the exterior.

Most of our customers apply Ipe Oil to the exterior only. If you are concerned with the oil finish there are food grade finishes that can be applied instead.

Angelim Pedra is one of the hardest and most durable woods available for exterior use and building.

Building raised garden beds with Angelim Pedra will give you beautiful long lasting garden beds so you can grow your own vegetables for many years to come without worrying about rotting wood or chemicals in your wood.

Best Wood Species for Outdoor Tables

If you are looking to build an outdoor table you want to use the best wood possible.

When building an outdoor table you want something that can last for generations without too much maintenance and issues like splinters.

Most people are familiar with the common softwood choices like Pressure Treated Pine, Cedar and Redwood.

Softwoods require a water sealer to keep water from penetrating the grain which can lead to faster rot and decay.

The water sealer typically needs to be applied every year and you’ll need to sand off any that is peeling first.

These woods will also splinter, check and crack over time leaving the table prone to giving you splinters.

There are 5 wood species that we recommend as the best wood species for outdoor tables.

Ipe

This incredible hardwood comes from South America.

It has proven to last up to 75+ years on commercial applications such as the Coney Island boardwalk.

Ipe Wood Outdoor Table

We typically sell Ipe wood for decking, fences, siding and more outdoor projects but it also works excellent for outdoor tables.

This porch deck is built with Ipe wood tongue & groove decking and shows the natural beauty of the wood.

Here’s a list of benefits that make Ipe one of the best wood choices for an outdoor table:

  • One of the strongest woods in the world
  • Environmentally friendly
  • Low maintenance
  • Up to a Class A fire rating for flame spread
  • Termite, Mold & Fungi resistant
  • No knots
  • High scratch & slip resistance
  • Can outlast composite material
  • Twice as strong as Oak
  • Time proven on many commercial projects

Due to the popularity and proven performance of Ipe wood outdoors it has become somewhat expensive.

Not to worry we have at least 5 other species that are significantly cheaper and offer very similar durability as Ipe.

Teak

Teak is our next top pick of wood options.

Most people are well aware of Teak’s reputation, it’s one of the most sought after woods for exterior use.

Boat builders have used this wood for centuries since there’s few things that see harsher elements than a boat.

Teak Wood Deck

Teak (Tectona grandis) grows all over the world, in southeast Asia, the East Indies, Africa, and America.

Our Teak grows in 20–50 year plantations, which means you get the hardest, most durable wood without harming the environment.

Teak is lighter than Ipe in both color and weight. Its color ranges from yellow brown to dark golden brown, darkening with age.

Because it is less dense than Ipe, Teak is also generally easier to work with.

Cumaru

Cumaru wood (aka Brazilian Teak) is the second hardest exterior hardwood we sell. In Brazil, Cumaru is used in mansions, five-star hotels and major commercial projects.

The color of Cumaru varies from a golden tan to a reddish brown with some dark grain accents through out the wood.

It has a 50+ year lifespan without preservatives! Our Cumaru wood is responsibly harvested from managed forests to provide a truly renewable resource.

Cumaru is a great wood choice for building and outdoor table. Take a look at these beautiful outdoor tables made using Cumaru wood.

Outdoor Table and Chairs Built with Cumaru Wood
Large Outdoor Table and Chairs Built with Cumaru Wood

Tigerwood

This beautiful hardwood also comes from South America and is one our employees often choose for their own homes.

Tigerwood (also known as Goncalo Alves) is one of the finest quality hardwoods available that features a unique light golden-brown to reddish-brown coloring with exotic black and brown streaks.


It is naturally resistant to rot and decay, is the third hardest decking we sell, and offers a 30+ year lifespan without preservatives!

Ipe and Tigerwood Outdoor Table

The table above features a custom Ipe wood border and inlay with an Ipe wood table base.

Tigerwood Outdoor Table and Patio Chairs

This table has an aluminum base, it once had another surface that was old and worn out.

Our customer sprayed the base black and added Tigerwood to resurface the table and chairs. The outdoor table and chairs look great and should last 30 years or more.

Garapa

This beautiful South American hardwood starts of a golden yellow color but in a short time when oiled and exposed to UV light it will turn a beautiful golden brown.

Garapa is an exotic hardwood that is naturally resistant to rot, decay and insect attack.

It is naturally scratch resistant which allows the surface to remain smooth for many years, making Garapa a perfect wood for outdoor tables and many other exterior projects.

You can expect a 30+ year lifespan without preservatives!

Garapa deck
Garapa Wood Deck

We don’t have a picture of an outdoor table built using Garapa but above is a beautiful deck built with this beautiful and durable hardwood.

Massaranduba

Massaranduba (pronounced Ma-Sa-Ran-Doo-bah) is a hardwood native to South America. It’s one of the hardest woods in the world, once it’s oiled and exposed to UV rays it looks very similar to Ipe wood.

One surprising fact about this natural hardwood is how well it performs under heavy load (bending strength) tests. These tests revealed that, as a decking material, Massaranduba is even stronger than Ipe decking.

This makes Massaranduba an excellent choice for outdoor tables.

massaranduba siding
Massaranduba Siding

We don’t have a picture of a table built using Massaranduba but this picture of our siding we milled gives you a good idea of how the wood will look.

How Long Does a Wood Deck Last

There are many wood choices to build a new deck with and some will last longer than others and offer less maintenance.

When it comes to a deck built with wood most homeowners think of pressure treated pine. It’s the most cost effective wood option and is readily available in most local building supply stores.

Pressure Treated Wood Decking

Pressure Treated Wood Deck

Softwoods like Pressure Treated Pine can be susceptible to rot, decay, mold, mildew and insect attack.

These woods require an application of a water sealer every year or sometimes every other year. This helps keep the water out of the wood grain which can accelerate rot.

A good water sealer should keep the water pooled on the surface and prevent it from penetrating the wood. Once the water stops pooling on the surface you should reapply more water sealer.

Pooled water on finished deck

Treated pine can also give you splinters and slivers in your feet. This can be reduced by keeping up on the maintenance.

You can sand and pressure wash a pressure treated wood deck which can help you restore your deck surface.

Below is a picture of a 10 year old pressure treated deck that was sanded and is getting a new stain and water sealer applied.

This is a lot of work but if the homeowner keeps up this maintenance he should be able to get another 10 years or more out of their deck.

10 Year Old Pressure Treated Wood Deck

The average life expectancy for a pressure treated wood deck is 15 – 20 years. Many will see something more like 10 – 15 years.

It really depends on how good you keep up with the maintenance each year as well as if your deck is constantly exposed to water and doesn’t get a lot of sun exposure to dry the deck out.

If you’re a busy homeowner and think you might not be able to keep up with the maintenance then a deck built with pressure treated will most likely have a shorter lifespan.

Cedar Wood Decking

Ground Level Cedar Wood Deck

The next most common wood decking option is Cedar. Cedar is another softwood but cedar does offer some natural resistance to rot and decay.

Cedar will eventually rot and decay as time goes on and just like pressure treated it requires a water sealer to prolong the life of the wood.

If maintained yearly you could expect a life expectancy of 20 – 25 years. Again this all depends on the wear and tear the deck sees as well as the annual maintenance.

Redwood Decking

Redwood Deck

Decks built with Redwood will require the same maintenance as Cedar and Pressure Treated Pine to help extend the lifespan of the wood.

Redwood is a softwood that offers some natural resistance to rot and decay. One very important thing to consider though is old growth Redwood was considered very durable to rot and decay.

Nowadays the majority of what you see for sale is younger secondary growth Redwood which is still considered moderately durable to rot and decay but not as much as the old growth material.

Hardwood Decking

Most people are not aware there are hardwood species proven to last up to 75 years or more with very little maintenance. Some of the species are over 3 times harder than Oak.

The decking species we recommend for most outdoor applications are:

These South American hardwoods are sustainably harvested and have proven to last up to 75 years with very low maintenance.

These species are naturally resistant to rot, decay, mold, mildew, splinter, class A rating against flame spread, resistant to wood boring insects, naturally slip resistant and not hot to walk on bare foot.

All of these qualities make them excellent for decks, fences, siding, benches and many other outdoor projects.

The only maintenance that’s required is cleaning the dirt and debris off the surface which is required by all decking manufacturers (especially composites).

Pollen, dirt, leaves, rain and other debris will land on all decks so a light power washing is a good idea when needed.

The only other maintenance that many homeowners choose to do is oiling the wood usually once a year. UV rays from the sun will bleach the color out of the wood and turn it grey.

Some homeowners like they grey look so they don’t have to do anything other than an occasional cleaning.

Oiling the wood will keep the beautiful color of the woods and enhance the beautiful grain. Once you see the beauty of these woods most homeowners want to maintain that look.

Do not be confused oiling hardwoods is incredibly easy and it’s not a top coat like water sealers for soft woods that will eventually peel off and leave you with a lot of maintenance.

Additionally with softwoods you really need to get a brush and apply water sealer in all the spacing between your deck boards to try and protect the edges of the boards from rot.

This is not the case with these hardwood species since some of these species are proven to last up to 75 years without any sealer or chemical treatments.

The oil is simply rolled on with a paint roller after that you wipe up any that did not soak into the wood. These woods are so dense they will only absorb so much oil. It will eventually fade away (usually spring time the following year). Then you just apply more oil.

How to Seal Ipe Wood

Ipe wood does not need to be sealed like traditional softwoods such as redwood, pine and cedar.

These softwoods have an open grain structure that allows water to penetrate deep into the wood cells like a sponge.

As a result softwoods need a waterproofing sealer that forms a top coat to keep water from penetrating the wood.

If softwoods are left unsealed for prolonged time periods they can deteriorate and rot much faster.

Homeowner sanding deck stain and sealer off an old cedar deck

These top coats will flake and peel off after only a year or two. Then ideally you would sand the entire deck and apply another sealer on top of the deck.

This is a lot of maintenance and what most people think of when it comes to sealing a wood deck.

What Maintenance Does Ipe Wood Require?

Unlike softwood decking Ipe wood does not require a waterproofing sealer to keep the wood from rotting.

Ipe is over 3 times harder than Teak and if you leave Ipe untreated it will turn a beautiful silver grey.

Grey Ipe Wood Deck
Grey Ipe wood deck

When Ipe turns grey it still shows the beautiful wood grain and maintains all of its durability and will still last up to 75 years or more.

Ipe is so dense and contains a natural oil that if you tried to seal it like you do a traditional wood deck it would peel right off.

Maintaining The Color of Ipe Wood

Ipe Oil
Ipe Oil applied to Ipe wood decking

The sun will bleach the color out of most materials and wood is no exception. UV rays are what causes wood to turn grey outdoors.

To stop Ipe wood from turning grey we recommend applying a special oil that’s specifically formulated for hardwoods like Ipe wood.

This is what most people mistake when they think I have to seal my Ipe wood.

The oil keeps the sun from bleaching the rich brown color from the Ipe wood. It’s basically like sunscreen for your Ipe.

Ipe Oil will not flake or peel off like a sealer on a traditional wood deck so it’s much lower maintenance.

Ipe Wood Maintenance Instructions

Maintaining your Ipe wood is typically very simple and these steps will help you keep your Ipe wood looking good for many years.

Step 1 – Wash your Ipe wood deck

You want to make sure our deck surface is free from dirt, debris, pollen and etc… before applying the oil on your Ipe wood.

Follow all the instructions on the can of Ipe Oil. You want to make sure you have adequate weather with the right temperatures and no rain in the forecast.

If needed you can pressure wash your deck with a wide angle fan tip nozzle. Do not use a concentrated fine tip as those can even damage concrete.

Step 2 – Apply the Ipe Oil

After allowing your deck to thoroughly dry you can apply the Ipe oil using a brush or roller. Make sure to follow all the instructions on the can of Ipe Oil.

This process goes pretty fast since the oil spreads very easy and saturates the Ipe wood evenly.

This is not like water sealing cedar or pressure treated where you need to brush it back and forth to work the sealer into the grain to make sure everything has a top coat.

Ipe Oil has a viscosity very similar to water and Ipe wood is so dense the roller will easily coat the boards.

Step 3 – Wipe up any excess Ipe Oil

Ipe wood is so dense it will only soak up so much of the Ipe Oil. You need to go back with a clean rag after 10 minutes and wipe up any excess or wet looking spots.

This will keep your Ipe deck from getting tacky. After that you can dispose of the rags properly (follow the instructions on the can) oil based rags balled up often can start on fire.

Best Wood For Outdoor Benches

If you are looking to build a new outdoor wooden bench or resurface and old outdoor bench read on as we’ll cover the best woods you can use for your bench.

Outdoor benches are most commonly made with pressure treated pine or cedar. The problem with these species is they are soft woods that generally require annual maintenance and application of a water sealer.

Softwoods like pressure treated pine and cedar have a open and somewhat porous grain structure which can tend to absorb water almost like a sponge.

While these woods do have some resistance to rot and decay and can last many years if properly maintained.

Many people find the maintenance to be too much work, so their outdoor bench gets neglected as shown in the picture below.

Old Pressure Treated Pine Bench with Peeling Stain

Stripping the old stain off an old bench like this one can be a lot of work getting in between all the bench slats. These benches often get neglected and have paint or stain peeling off the majority of the bench.

Once this occurs the wood is left unprotected and when it rains the wood usually stays saturated for an extended time period making them often undesirable to sit on.

In addition these softwoods can give off splinters and eventually get attacked by wood boring insects which can also make them not pleasant to sit on.

Is Composite Plastic Lumber Good for Outdoor Benches?

In our years of experience selling exterior lumber for decks and other exterior projects we’ve seen too many complaints from homeowners to make us comfortable selling any plastic lumber for now.

Every week we get complaints from homeowners who installed a composite plastic deck a few years ago that need to replace their entire deck because it’s failing and the manufacturer won’t honor their warranty.

Crumbling Composite Decking

If you want to read more about all the issues homeowners have faced with these products just Google search “composite decking problems”, “composite decking complaints” or “brand name decking reviews”.

You’ll be able to read about plenty of issues homeowners have struggled with so as a result of all this feedback we generally stay away and don’t recommend these products.

The 5 Best Woods for Outdoor Benches

Ipe (pronounced EE-pay) is an all natural hardwood that is more than three times harder than teak. It has shown to last up to 75 years or more on many commercial applications such as the Coney Island boardwalk and the Brooklyn bridge.

Ipe Wood Bench

This hardwood is one of the strongest woods in the world and naturally resists wood boring insects. Ipe wood does not splinter and will not get incredibly hot like plastic lumber.

In addition it’s also naturally slip resistant, has a Class A rating for flame spread, is scratch resistant and naturally mold and fungi resistant. It’s also so dense that it does not absorb water.

All of these excellent natural properties make Ipe wood our number one recommendation for not only decks but many outdoor projects such as outdoor wood benches.

You can view our current Ipe prices here: Ipe Wood Prices

Cumaru Wood

Similar to Ipe Cumaru wood is nearly identical in terms of properties and durability. The main difference is the color color ranges from a golden tan to a reddish brown.

Cumaru Deck

You can still expect all the same excellent properties as Ipe.

This excellent wood is also low maintenance, resistant to wood boring insects and naturally resistant to rot and decay without chemicals.

One other benefit to using Cumaru is the price can be upwards of 40 percent cheaper compared to the price of Ipe wood. You can view the current Cumaru wood prices here: Cumaru Wood Prices

Tigerwood Exterior Lumber

This beautiful wood also comes from South America and is incredibly durable and beautiful. You can expect a 30+ year lifespan with Tigerwood.

Similar to the other woods we listed above Tigerwood is also resistant to wood boring insects, mold and mildew and does not splinter. This is another excellent low maintenance exterior wood material that works great for benches, decks, fences, siding and more.

Tigerwood Decking

Garapa Wood

Also known as Brazilian Ash this incredible exterior hardwood is one of the finest quality hardwoods that features a fine-grain that is light yellow to a warm golden hue.

Garapa is naturally resistant to rot, decay and insect attack and offers a 30+ year lifespan. Garapa’s proven exterior durability make it an excellent choice for outdoor benches, decks and more.

Garapa Deck

You can find more info and pricing here: Garapa wood prices

Massaranduba Wood

Also known as Brazilian Redwood Massaranduba is much more durable than California Redwood, has a longer lifespan and requires much less maintenance.

In fact Massaranduba is over 7x harder than California Redwood. With a janka hardness of 3,190 compared to California Redwood which has a janka hardness of 420.

California Redwood is a softwood and requires annual maintenance of applying a water sealer to keep water out of the grain of the wood to prolong its life and prevent rot and decay.

Just like the first four species of exterior hardwoods that we recommended, Massaranduba naturally resists rot, decay and wood boring insects.

In addition Massaranduba is also a very low maintenance exterior hardwood and offers a 30+ year lifespan. This makes it great for many projects such as exterior wood benches, decks, siding and more.

Checkout these beautiful outdoor wood benches that were built with our beautiful South American hardwoods.

Ipe Tree

What Does Ipe Stand For?

Ipe is not an abbreviation. Rather, it’s the common name of Tabebuia serratifolia, a tropical hardwood lumber specie. The correct pronunciation is “EE-pay”. Other common names for ipe include Brazilian walnut and ironwood.

The ipe tree is native to South America. However, it also grows throughout Mexico, the Caribbean, southern Florida, and other tropical regions.

Ipe wood is extremely dense, making it one of the most durable woods in the world. It’s also a beautiful wood, boasting a rich, dark brown color. As a result, ipe is highly sought after for high-end exterior woodworking projects. It’s a popular material for decks, siding, fences, and outdoor furniture.

AdvantageLumber.com carries the largest inventory of ipe lumber in North America. We mill ipe into decking, siding, interior flooring, live-edge slabs, and cabinet-grade lumber.

Ipe vs. Teak

Burmese Teak board shown above is genuine teak (not plantation grown)

Most people are familiar with Teak wood, it’s been well known to last outdoors without many of the common issues of softwoods.

Since Teak is so well known for it’s exterior durability it has been widely used for outdoor furniture and boat building.

This has driven up the demand for Teak which then increases the price as well. Genuine Teak (Burmese Teak) is very expensive. Old growth “Burmese Teak” is also becoming near impossible and in some areas its illegal to harvest.

It’s becoming known as “Conflict Teak” due to old growth teak lumber being over harvested, corruption, human rights violations and many other issues.

Teak harvesting from Myanmar “Burma” is now banned completely due to all these issues.

Fortunately there is Plantation Teak that is sustainably grown in managed forests that is completely ethical and legal.

Advantage Plantation Teak is grown in sustainable managed plantations. We’ve hand selected the best plantations that grow teak in its optimal growing conditions.

Our plantations strive to recreate optimal growing conditions that mimic Southeast Asia. This allows forestry experts to produce plantation teak that does not use fertilizers or irrigation to try and make the trees grow faster. 

In addition we only harvest from older growth 25 – 50 year trees so we produce lumber with tighter grain and less sapwood.

There’s a lot of misinformation spread throughout the lumber industry that plantation teak is not as dense as old growth Burmese Teak.

However the United States Forest Service USDA did a study on 10 tropical hardwood species. 

One of those species was Teak and they found no significant relationship between the growth rate of plantation teak and its density or durability to withstand extreme weather conditions.

You can read the full report here for yourself: https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/pdf2001/willi01d.pdf

In fact, in some tests the plantation Teak actually performed better than the old growth Burmese Teak.

Teak contains a high natural oil content as well as silica and even rubber. All of these natural occurring compounds give Teak wood it’s incredible durability to withstand years of weathering.

Additionally teak is also highly resistant to rot, fungi and mildew thanks to it’s high natural oil and silica content.

Teak also has a very low shrinkage ratio, Teak’s volumetric shrinkage is 7.2% whereas Ipe is 12.4%. 

This means overall Teak will expand and contract less than Ipe would with seasonal changes and in extreme weather conditions.

Teak weighs 41 lbs/ft3 opposed to Ipe that weighs 69 lbs/ft3. This makes Teak a great choice for rooftop decks, boats and other projects where weight is a concern.

Like Ipe overtime Teak will weather to a beautiful silver grey and can last many years outdoors with no treatment if you don’t mind the grey look.

Teak Wood Lifespan

The lifespan of teak is known to be up to 50 years if properly maintained. If teak is left to turn a natural grey and not oiled each year you can expect teak in this condition to last 30 years or more depending on how harsh the climate is.

Teak Price Vs. Ipe Price

Our plantation grown Teak is some of the most affordable Teak you will find! You can buy teak wood online and have it shipped directly to your home.

Ipe wood and Teak have been used for many years for both exterior and interior projects.

Ipe is primarily sold for exterior decking, fencing, siding and many other exterior projects. Our Teak and Ipe currently have the same price point

Ipe Wood Deck
Ipe Wood Deck – Miami, Florida

Is Ipe Better Than Teak?

Ipe wood is a South American hardwood that is over three times harder on the Janka scale compared to genuine teak.

The Janka test is a measure of the hardness of wood. The Janka test was developed as a variation of the Brinell hardness test. The test measures the force required to push a steel ball with a diameter of 11.28 millimeters (0.444 inches) into the wood to a depth of half the ball’s diameter. The diameter was chosen to produce a circle with an area of 100 square millimeters.

  • The Janka hardness of Teak is: 1,050
  • The Janka hardness of Ipe is: 3,680

Teak is still an exceptionally hard wood and has some advantages over Ipe which might be important for your project.

Choose Teak if you want a lighter colored golden brown wood, if material weight is an issue teak weighs less than Ipe. Teak moves less so if you project is going to see extreme weather than Teak is a good choice.

You can view current Ipe prices as well our Teak prices and get more information and free samples from AdvantageLumber.com